RedVector User Satisfaction Survey: User Satisfaction Positive
By Jeff Walter
10/6/2013

 
 
 
 

 

RedVector

User Satisfaction Index: 7

 

We asked your opinions on the eLearning courses offered by RedVector to find out what you think of them.  Founded in 1999, Tampa Bay based RedVector has positioned itself as a niche learning solution for the construction and design industries. They offer continuing education courses for Engineers, Contractors and Architects, promising a training product that's convenient and easy to use.  For the most part, it sounds like they deliver on the promise. Many respondents noted the quality and depth of the course catalog as major advantages. We've reviewed the feedback and as our exclusive "Satisfaction Meter" indicates, the overall User Satisfaction index of 7 suggests that most users are quite pleased with RedVector.

 

How They Rate RedVector


RedVector received an average rating of 8.6 from respondents when asked the likelihood of recommending to a friend, where 0 is "not at all likely" and 10 is "extremely likely". 43% of respondents gave a rating of 9 or 10. While 36% gave a rating between 0 and 6.  Overall more than 21% of all respondents gave it a rating of 7 or 8.


What They Like about RedVector


Overall people liked the quality and depth of the eLearning courses from RedVector.  Some also noted that the software layout is relatively easy to understand and navigate.  Among the comments we received:

"RedVector is a good learning system and offers more ability for me to manage licenses and trainings ."

"Very informational and you can pick what you want to read/learn ."


What They Don't Like about RedVector


When asked what users didn't like about the software, very few offered strong objections as evidenced by the lowest recorded rating of 5.  This would seem to indicate that at worse users were mildly indifferent to the features and overall performance.

"I don't like all the board licensing rules they have to follow. I understand why -- I guest this is more of an issue with the state boards than RedVector.." 

"Sometimes the search course function is not quick ."


When They Use or Recommend  RedVector


The majority of those who commented said they used RedVector primarily to prepare for board certifications or as a refresher on specialized construction industry learning concepts.

"All the time. Honestly they have a wider variety of current material that keeps me up to date and I've never had a single issue with any of the board approvals. If I have an issue I just call and they take care or it. "

"To gain construction specific project management knowledge or construction related engineering knowledge."

"...whenever a friend is going to take a license"

 

 

Let us know what you think about RedVector





Categories: categoryUser Review



1 Comments


  • Ray Riedel 12/17/2013
    Redvector allows engineers and surveyors to read lightweight powerpoint presentations illustrated by clipart, and submit the hours as required training hours to meet bureaucratic state requirements. Users can print out the quiz before reading the powerpoints and mark the multiple choice answer as they go. I would expect an average 8th grader could pass their courses. Don't take my word for it, try one of their courses and see for yourself. Don't expect to get your money back if the course is not useful. Only if your state bureacrats don't except the course hours will you get a refund. After two years and $1000, I went again with a $500 payment to meet my course hours, then changed my mind. I didn't take any of the new courses I paid for as I was tired of paying good money for useless clipart (example:people in hardhats looking at blueprints) powerpoints just to play a bureacratic game. They had provided no service or materials, but would not refund the $500. It is my opinion their training is a sham and people participate only to save the time and expense that real training requires. This fake training is 1/4 the cost of real training, and 15 hours can be completed in half that time. If users expose it for what it is, they risk loosing credit for required training hours.

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